Simpson University Invites Community to ‘The Reformation at 500’ Celebration

For Immediate Release

09.27.2017

Reformation at 500 Celebration

REDDING, Calif. - Simpson University invites the community to join students, faculty and staff for a four-day commemoration of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation.

“The Reformation at 500: A Community Celebration” will take place Oct. 25-28 and include academic lecture and discussion, community worship, and the performing arts.

During the past year many church-related universities have been hosting special events to remember afresh the enduring cultural and religious heritage of the Protestant Reformation. Historians often date the Reformation movement to 31 October 1517, when Martin Luther posted his Ninety-Five Theses, inviting a public debate on certain church practices.

“As a Christian university in the evangelical Protestant tradition, Simpson has a special interest in remembering the broad legacy of the Reformation, and we are pleased to be able to extend an open invitation to our Redding community to share in this celebration,” said Dr. Craig Slane, professor of systematic theology.

Free events include chapel services at 10:20 a.m. Oct. 25 and 27 (Wednesday and Friday) inside the James M. Grant Student Life Center; and a 7 p.m. Oct. 26 (Thursday) lecture and discussion inside LaBaume-Rudat Hall, room 204.

Featured speakers include Dr. Timothy Orr, history professor, on “Legacies of the Reformation” (Oct. 25), and Dr. Nicole Kenley, English professor, on “Luther on Film: The First 90 Years” (Oct. 26). During the Oct. 27 chapel, Dr. Slane will facilitate a panel discussion on “Why Does the Reformation Matter?”

Capping off the weekend are two special music events. At 7:30 p.m. Oct. 27 (Friday), the Simpson University Chorale and Trinity Repertory Singers will present “Singing Our Faith: 500 Years of Song” inside the Grant Center.

At 7:30 p.m. Oct. 28 (Saturday), the Shasta Symphony Orchestra will present “Revenge and Reformation,” a concert including Stravinsky’s “Petroushka” and Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 5 “The Reformation” in the Shasta College Theatre. The cost for each concert is $10 general admission, $8 seniors, $5 students.

“Music and hymn singing were an important part of Luther’s theology,” said Dr. Dan Pinkston, chair of Simpson’s Music Department. “Luther’s legacy includes centuries of excellent music, including the pieces to be performed during this celebration.”

For more information on the Reformation at 500: A Community Celebration, visit simpsonu.edu/reformation. To purchase concert tickets, visit simpsonu.edu/musicevents.

Schedule of Events


Wednesday, 25 October
Reformation Chapel Service | “Legacies of the Reformation"
Location: James M. Grant Student Life Center
Time: 10:20 a.m.
Cost: Free


Thursday, 26 October
Evening Lecture | “Luther on Film: The First 90 Years”
Location: LaBaume - Rudat Hall, Room 204
Time: 7 p.m.
Cost: Free


Friday, 27 October
Reformation Chapel Service | “Why Does the Reformation Matter?" Panel Discussion
Location: James M. Grant Student Life Center
Time: 10:20 a.m.
Cost: Free

Simpson University Chorale and Trinity Repertory Singers
“Singing Our Faith: 500 Years of Song”
Location: James M. Grant Student Life Center
Time: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: $10 general, $8 seniors, $5 students


Saturday, 28 October
Shasta Symphony Orchestra
Mendelssohn’s Reformation Symphony
Location: Shasta College Theatre
Time: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: $10 general, $8 seniors, $5 students

Faculty Bios


Dr. Timothy Orr, assistant professor of history
“Legacies of the Reformation” | 10:20 a.m. Oct. 25 | James M. Grant Student Life Center

Dr. Orr received a B.A. from John Brown University, an M.A. from the University of Tulsa, and a Ph.D. from Baylor University. His research focuses on the formation of religious and national identities in early-modern Europe through the experience of exile. His publications can be found in Church History and Religious Culture, Cambridge's Martin Luther in Context, and an upcoming edited collection from Vandenhoeck and Ruprecht. Dr. Orr is a regular participant in the Sixteenth Century Society Conferences, including presenting a paper this month in Milwaukee on the gender dynamics of flight in the Reformation. He joined Simpson University’s faculty in 2017.

Dr. Nicole Kenley, assistant professor of English
“Luther on Film: The First 90 Years” | 7 p.m. Oct. 26 | LaBaume-Rudat Hall, room 204

Dr. Kenley received a B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, an M.A. from New York University, and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis. She is at work on her first book project, Detecting Globalization, which examines American detective fiction’s shift from a national literature to a global one post-1970. In addition to detective fiction, her fields of interest include contemporary American literature, gender studies, and the literature of globalization. Her scholarship appears in the journals Mississippi Quarterly and Clues as well as the edited collections Crime Uncovered: Antihero from Intellect and the forthcoming Teaching Crime Fiction from Palgrave Macmillan. She joined Simpson University’s faculty in 2015 and launched the university’s On the Same Page common reading program in 2016.

Dr. Craig Slane, professor of systematic theology
Panel facilitator, “Why Does the Reformation Matter?” | 10:20 a.m. Oct. 27 | Grant Center

Dr. Slane received a B.A. and an M.A. from Wheaton College (IL) and a Ph.D. and Th.M. from the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. His research interests include the viability of a Christian university in a postmodern and post-Christian setting; exploration of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s legacy for the 21st century; and early Christianity from the first century through the period of the ecumenical councils. Dr. Slane is a board member of the International Bonhoeffer Society and has also taught courses in theology at Wheaton College. He joined Simpson University’s faculty in 1995.

Dr. Cyril Myers, guest conductor
Simpson University Chorale and Trinity Repertory Singers | 7:30 p.m. Oct. 27 | Grant Center

Dr. Myers holds a doctorate in choral conducting from Michigan State University and has extensive experience that includes being choral director at Walla Walla University, Indiana University-Purdue University Ft. Wayne, and Southwest Michigan College. Dr. Myers was Simpson’s choral director for four years and now serves as the music teacher of Monterey Junior High School.

Dr. Dwayne Corbin, associate professor of instrumental music
Music Director, Shasta Symphony Orchestra | 7:30 p.m. Oct. 28 | Shasta College Theatre

Dr. Corbin is music director of the Shasta Symphony Orchestra (SSO), associate professor of instrumental music at Simpson University, and resident conductor of the North State Symphony. In the past he was the interim assistant conductor of the Juneau Symphony, led the Cincinnati Youth Wind Ensemble, conducted wind ensembles at Wheaton College and the University of Cincinnati, and taught public school programs in the greater Seattle and Chicago areas.

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Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduate, graduate, and teaching credential programs. The university celebrated its 25th year in Redding and the completion of a Science and Nursing Center in 2014. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings, including degrees in psychology and organizational leadership. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu.

 

Contact: SU Public Relations
mediarelations@simpsonu.edu
(530) 226-4737