English

The English major is designed not only to educate students for a career in the literary area of their choice, but also to prepare them for graduate studies. Most literature classes are seminar-style where students get to share their opinions on pieces they have read. The variety of writing classes offered prepares students for careers in the areas of communication, journalism, and publication.

English Department Mission

To offer a varied course selection, a faculty committed to making sure each major in the program succeeds, and guidance for genuine intellectual inquiry and growth grounded in a Christian worldview.

Writing Center

The Writing Center is a free service available to all enrolled students and the community of Redding. It is fully staffed by Simpson students who receive credit for their time. To schedule an appointment or inquire about becoming a tutor, please email writingcenter@simpsonu.edu.

General Track

The “General Track” allows students to choose a variety of upper division literature and writing electives, in addition to the core classes of the English major.

FOUNDATIONAL STUDIES EXCEPTION:

Take the following course under HUMANITIES:

ENGL 2100 Introduction to Literature (3)

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS (42)

CORE COURSES (30)

*ENGL 2200 British Lit to 1800 (3, F)

*ENGL 2205 British Lit from 1800 (3, Sp)

*ENGL 2210 American Lit to 1865 (3, F)

*ENGL 2215 American Lit from 1865 (3, Sp)

*ENGL 3100 Literary Theory (3; EF)

*ENGL 3210 Western Literature (3, Sp)

*ENGL 3220 World Literature (3)

*ENGL 3280 Seminar in English Grammar (3)

*ENGL 4950 Senior Seminar


One of the following:

*ENGL 3240 Shakespeare (3; SU, & OF)

*ENGL 3420 Shakespeare on Film (3; EF)


One of the following:

*ENGL 3200W Advanced Composition (3)

*ENGL 3360 Technical Writing (3, Sp

GENERAL TRACK (12)

(6 must be upper division)
Choose one course from each of the following three categories:

Category 1 - One course in American Literature or British Literature (in addition to ENGL 2200, ENGL 2205, ENGL 2210 and ENGL 2215).

Category 2 - One writing course (in addition to either ENGL 3200W or ENGL 3360).

Category 3 - Any other two upper-division English courses (including ENGL 3420, ENGL 4810, ENGL 4820, or ENGL 3281).

SAMPLE TOTAL PROGRAM

Foundational Studies 62
General Track English Major 42
Unrestricted Electives 20

TOTAL 124

Literature Track

The “Literature Track” gives students the opportunity to go more in depth into both American and British literature. The electives for this track are solely based on upper-division literature courses.

FOUNDATIONAL STUDIES Exception:

Take the following course under HUMANITIES:

ENGL 2100 Introduction to Literature (3)

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS (42)

CORE COURSES (30)

*ENGL 2200 British Lit to 1800 (3, F)

*ENGL 2205 British Lit from 1800 (3, Sp)

*ENGL 2210 American Lit to 1865 (3, F)

*ENGL 2215 American Lit from 1865 (3, Sp)

*ENGL 3100 Literary Theory (3; EF)

*ENGL 3210 Western Literature (3, Sp)

*ENGL 3220 World Literature (3)

*ENGL 3280 Seminar in English Grammar (3)

*ENGL 4950 Senior Seminar


One of the following:

*ENGL 3240 Shakespeare (3; SU, & OF)

*ENGL 3420 Shakespeare on Film (3; EF)


One of the following:

*ENGL 3200W Advanced Composition (3)

*ENGL 3360 Technical Writing (3, Sp)

LITERATURETRACK (12)

(6 must be upper division)

12 credits of literature electives that will be offered in the following categories: major author(s), genre, historical period, or literary movement. Electives will be listed under the following designations:

*ENGL 3400 American Literature Elective (3, F)

*ENGL 4400 British Literature Elective (3, Sp)

*Course has prerequisites; check course descriptions in catalog.

SAMPLE TOTAL PROGRAM

Foundational Studies 62
Literature Track 42
Unrestricted Electives 20

TOTAL 124

Writing Specialization

The “Writing Specialization” track gives English majors an education founded on a variety of English and communication classes.

English for Teachers

The English for Teachers program is designed to prepare students for a career in English education. With focuses on British, American, Western, and Shakespearean literature, students become familiar with several writing styles and are prepared to teach such literature. Students can also focus on creative writing, cinema, journalism, and composition.

Timothy Carlisle, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of English and Literature
English Department Chair


tcarlisle@simpsonu.edu
530-226-4122

Profile:

A specialist in American Literature, Dr. Tim Carlisle teaches a two-semester survey in this area, as well as numerous other classes. In addition to teaching at Simpson University, he has also taught courses in composition, literature, William Shakespeare, Geoffrey Chaucer, and Restoration & Eighteenth-Century at Gonzaga University and Washington State University. Dr. Carlisle has delivered papers on the novels of Walker Percy and his use of the ideas of Gabriel Marcel. In fall of 2007, he reviewed Walker Percy's Search for Community, by John F. Desmond, for Studies in Modern Fiction.

Dr. Carlisle was instrumental in the formation of Simpson's Writing Center. While on sabbatical during the fall of 2004, he researched and has written on the subject of plagiarism, attempting to formulate an ethical, collaborative approach to composition instruction. Currently, Dr. Carlisle serves as the chair for the English Department.

Educational Background:

  • Ph.D. Washington State University
  • M.A., Niagara University
  • B.A., Westmont University

Courses Taught:

  • American poetry
  • Fiction
  • Drama
  • Cinema
  • Composition
  • American Literature I & II
  • World Literature
  • Shakespeare
  • Chaucer

Links:

Brian Larsen, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of English


blarsen@simpsonu.edu
530-226-4948

Profile:

Dr. Brian Larsen, Associate Professor of English, is currently in his tenth year at Simpson University, where he has taught a variety of classes in art, writing, and literature. He has a B.A. in English from Whitworth College, M. Div. from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, and Ph.D. from the Institute for Theology, Imagination, and the Arts at The University of St. Andrews, Scotland. With degrees in both literature and Biblical studies/theology, Dr. Larsen is an interdisciplinarian interested in the ways Christianity interacts and informs literature and art. He believes that art and the imagination are neglected in Evangelical Christianity and that art and the imagination form key components of a Christian response to postmodernism. Dr. Larsen was raised on a farm/cattle ranch in eastern Washington that he operated with his father for nine years. His hobbies include motorcycles and playing the guitar. He has been married to his wife, Elaine, for twenty-five years, and they have three college age children.

Educational Background:

  • Ph.D., University of St. Andrews, Scotland
  • M.Div., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
  • B.A., Whitworth College

Courses Taught:

  • Principles of College Writing I
  • Principles of College Writing II
  • Introduction to Literature
  • English Seminar
  • Fine Arts in Western Culture
  • Advanced Composition
  • Western Literature
  • World Literature
  • British Novels
  • Senior Seminar

Links:

Mardy Philippian, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of English


mphilippian@simpsonu.edu
530-226-4720

Profile:

Every semester Dr. Mardy Philippian tells his students, "How you read is who you are," a statement that makes clear his commitment to developing a generous repertoire of reading strategies. The claim also makes clear his love of surprise, especially when it results in the experience of knowing the familiar, as T. S. Eliot said, for the first time. Reading and rereading should surprise and, in so doing, sustain the mind, heart, and spirit.

This approach to reading literary (and visual) texts is quite different from the strategies that characterized reading in the early modern period, the area of research and writing in which Dr. Philippian completed his doctoral work at Purdue University. In the sixteenth century in particular it was normative to read to confirm what one already knew. And yet the English Renaissance was the period of the greatest flowering of creative energy in the history of the English people (if not the language), exemplified in the work of Shakespeare, Donne, Jonson, Herbert, and Milton among others. Reading to confirm and to discover are two sides of the same page and experiencing the tension between them is part of what animates and directs the courses Professor Philippian teaches and is at the heart of his research.

Dr. Philippian also serves as director of the Simpson University Writing Center, where he oversees and trains a most outrageous and talented group of tutors. His reviews, articles, and book chapters have appeared in Literature and Film Quarterly, Film Criticism, Prose Studies, and Forum for World Literature Studies. He has also presented his work at numerous academic conferences in the United States.

Educational Background:

  • Ph.D., Purdue University
  • M.A., Purdue University
  • B.A., California State University, Chico

Courses Taught:

  • Expository Writing
  • Shakespeare
  • Shakespeare on Film
  • British Literature Surveys I and II
  • The Life and Writings of C.S. Lewis
  • Milton's poetry and prose
  • Literature of Science
  • World Cinema
  • Introduction to Literary Theory
  • Renaissance and Reformation Literature

Links:

Dayton Phillips, M.A.

Instructor of English

Instructor of Communication


dphillips@simpsonu.edu
530-226-471

Profile:

Professor Dayton Phillips, Instructor of English and Communication, has served at Simpson University for 10 years. He started teaching at Simpson University in the fall of 2002. He has taught courses in the Writing Specialty track, including Writing Fiction, Writing Poetry, Technical Writing, Writing for Mass Media, Fundamentals of Journalism, Editing for Technical and Professional Communication, and Principles of Writing I and II. Professor Phillips has also taught an introductory Asian American literature course.

After being honorably discharged from the U.S. Air Force in 1978, Professor Phillips worked in the construction and oil field industries in Texas. Taking advantage of the Vietnam G.I. Bill, he attended college part-time until he earned his B.A.T. (Bachelor of Arts with teaching credentials) in English at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, TX, in 1984. Professor Phillips taught high school English, math, and adult basic education classes until completing an M.A. in English at SHSU in 1993. Professor Phillips taught college writing courses at Blinn College and Texas A&M University in Bryan and College Station, TX, before moving to Northern California in 2001.

Professor Phillips is an ordained Southern Baptist pastor. He and his Asian American wife of 32 years, Nai Meng, are currently serving at Hope Baptist Church in Redding, Calif.

Educational Background:

  • M.A., Sam Houston State University
  • B.A., Sam Houston State University

Courses Taught:

  • Principles of College Writing I
  • Principles of College Writing II
  • Fundamentals of Journalism
  • Technical Writing
  • Technical Editing
  • Creative Writing
  • Poetry Writing
  • Fiction Writing
  • Writing for Mass Media
  • Asian American Literature

Links:

  • Literary History
  • Critical Theory
  • Literary Genres
  • Rhetorical Theory and Practice

"Write with fluency; speak with eloquence; reason with passion; while they are not promises, they are your opportunities through the English program at Simpson. With only a small measure of the aforementioned capabilities, I have been able to reinvent myself and transition between professions in education, banking, and now ministry. When asked how I managed it, I like to esteem my time under the knowledgeable, passionate, and personable professors of the English program at Simpson. The English program at Simpson remains the greatest academic contribution to my professional success and personal happiness—and that is after continuing onto graduate studies and (achieving other) professional certifications.

In banking we are coached to consult clients in medias res (à la Homer's Odyssey)—but only literature majors recognize it. Workplace politics often resemble Victorian satire—but English majors can smile slyly at the occurrence. Reading Melville prepares you for deciphering corporate jargon—but everyone else thinks you just 'catch on quickly.' "

Francisco X. Roliz II, Class of 2003
Currently serving as the Director of Youth Ministries at Trinity Baptist Church in New York City
http://ww.facebook.com/youthnyc

 

"As an English major, I was introduced to a broad scope of literature and given the opportunity to develop a thoughtful response to it. I enjoyed having small classes that allowed for in-depth instruction and vibrant discussions. The one-on-one guidance from my professors, especially Dr. Carlisle, really helped build my skills in writing, editing and analysis - skills I use on a daily basis. My degree has been very useful for my career as a nonprofit professional; but my career choice was largely influenced by Simpson's focus on serving others - and it has been an incredibly rewarding path."

- Andrea (Ventresca) Scott, Class of 1999

 

"During my last year at Simpson I earnestly pursued graphic design, and sought to apply to my art what I had learned from my major. The results astounded me. I was able to convey clearly my intent by applying the major's methods, and people reacted well – well enough to give me a job as a graphic designer for a national company. I've since applied the English Discipline to programming, marketing, and social media. I continue to study branches of English and the liberal arts as an academic exercise. It has been the most relevant pursuit in my life to date."

- Tyler Schuster, Class of 2012