English

Majors

  • General Track
    The “General Track” allows students to choose a variety of upper division literature and writing electives, in addition to the core classes of the English major.

    FOUNDATIONAL STUDIES EXCEPTION:

    Take the following course under HUMANITIES:

    ENGL 2100 Introduction to Literature (3)

    MAJOR REQUIREMENTS (42)

    CORE COURSES (30)

    *ENGL 2200 British Lit to 1800 (3, F)

    *ENGL 2205 British Lit from 1800 (3, Sp)

    *ENGL 2210 American Lit to 1865 (3, F)

    *ENGL 2215 American Lit from 1865 (3, Sp)

    *ENGL 3100 Literary Theory (3; EF)

    *ENGL 3210 Western Literature (3, Sp)

    *ENGL 3220 World Literature (3)

    *ENGL 3280 Seminar in English Grammar (3)

    *ENGL 4950 Senior Seminar


    One of the following:

    *ENGL 3240 Shakespeare (3; SU, & OF)

    *ENGL 3420 Shakespeare on Film (3; EF)


    One of the following:

    *ENGL 3200W Advanced Composition (3)

    *ENGL 3360 Technical Writing (3, Sp)

    GENERAL TRACK (12)

    (6 must be upper division)
    Choose one course from each of the following three categories:

    Category 1 - One course in American Literature or British Literature (in addition to ENGL 2200, ENGL 2205, ENGL 2210 and ENGL 2215).

    Category 2 - One writing course (in addition to either ENGL 3200W or ENGL 3360).

    Category 3 - Any other two upper-division English courses (including ENGL 3420, ENGL 4810, ENGL 4820, or ENGL 3281).

    SAMPLE TOTAL PROGRAM

    Foundational Studies 62
    General Track English Major 42
    Unrestricted Electives 20

    TOTAL 124

  • Literature Track

    The “Literature Track” gives students the opportunity to go more in depth into both American and British literature. The electives for this track are solely based on upper-division literature courses.

    FOUNDATIONAL STUDIES Exception:

    Take the following course under HUMANITIES:

    ENGL 2100 Introduction to Literature (3)

    MAJOR REQUIREMENTS (42)

    CORE COURSES (30)

    *ENGL 2200 British Lit to 1800 (3, F)

    *ENGL 2205 British Lit from 1800 (3, Sp)

    *ENGL 2210 American Lit to 1865 (3, F)

    *ENGL 2215 American Lit from 1865 (3, Sp)

    *ENGL 3100 Literary Theory (3; EF)

    *ENGL 3210 Western Literature (3, Sp)

    *ENGL 3220 World Literature (3)

    *ENGL 3280 Seminar in English Grammar (3)

    *ENGL 4950 Senior Seminar


    One of the following:

    *ENGL 3240 Shakespeare (3; SU, & OF)

    *ENGL 3420 Shakespeare on Film (3; EF)


    One of the following:

    *ENGL 3200W Advanced Composition (3)

    *ENGL 3360 Technical Writing (3, Sp)

    LITERATURETRACK (12)

    (6 must be upper division)

    12 credits of literature electives that will be offered in the following categories: major author(s), genre, historical period, or literary movement. Electives will be listed under the following designations:

    *ENGL 3400 American Literature Elective (3, F)

    *ENGL 4400 British Literature Elective (3, Sp)

    *Course has prerequisites; check course descriptions in catalog.

    SAMPLE TOTAL PROGRAM

    Foundational Studies 62
    Literature Track 42
    Unrestricted Electives 20

    TOTAL 124

  • Writing Specialization

    The “Writing Specialization” track gives English majors an education founded on a variety of English and communication classes.

  • English for Teachers

    The English for Teachers program is designed to prepare students for a career in English education. With focuses on British, American, Western, and Shakespearean literature, students become familiar with several writing styles and are prepared to teach such literature. Students can also focus on creative writing, cinema, journalism, and composition.


Minors


Learning Outcomes

  • Literary Genres: Students will be able to identify the salient features of traditional and contemporary categories of classification of a wide variety of written works, including by not limited to works of poetry, fiction, drama
  • Literary History: Students will be able to think critically about approaches to the selection and inclusion as canonical of a wide variety of written works, including but not limited to works of poetry, fiction, drama
  • Critical Theory: Students will be able to evaluate and internalize major schools of critical inquiry for application in the textual analysis of a wide variety of written works, including but not limited to works of poetry, fiction, drama
  • Rhetorical Theory and Practice: Students will be able to communicate effectively by analyzing, evaluating, and putting into practice both traditional and contemporary theories of composition in collegiate and post-collegiate writing

Major Specific Resources


Academic Resources

Writing Center

Writing Center Logo

The Writing Center is a free service available to all enrolled students and the community of Redding. It is fully staffed by Simpson students who receive credit for their time. To schedule an appointment or inquire about becoming a tutor, please email writingcenter@simpsonu.edu.

News and Related Resources

"Write with fluency; speak with eloquence; reason with passion; while they are not promises, they are your opportunities through the English program at Simpson. With only a small measure of the aforementioned capabilities, I have been able to reinvent myself and transition between professions in education, banking, and now ministry. When asked how I managed it, I like to esteem my time under the knowledgeable, passionate, and personable professors of the English program at Simpson. The English program at Simpson remains the greatest academic contribution to my professional success and personal happiness—and that is after continuing onto graduate studies and (achieving other) professional certifications.

In banking we are coached to consult clients in medias res (à la Homer's Odyssey)—but only literature majors recognize it. Workplace politics often resemble Victorian satire—but English majors can smile slyly at the occurrence. Reading Melville prepares you for deciphering corporate jargon—but everyone else thinks you just 'catch on quickly.' "Francisco X. Roliz II, Class of 2003

"As an English major, I was introduced to a broad scope of literature and given the opportunity to develop a thoughtful response to it. I enjoyed having small classes that allowed for in-depth instruction and vibrant discussions. The one-on-one guidance from my professors, especially Dr. Carlisle, really helped build my skills in writing, editing and analysis - skills I use on a daily basis. My degree has been very useful for my career as a nonprofit professional; but my career choice was largely influenced by Simpson's focus on serving others - and it has been an incredibly rewarding path."Andrea (Ventresca) Scott, Class of 1999

"During my last year at Simpson I earnestly pursued graphic design, and sought to apply to my art what I had learned from my major. The results astounded me. I was able to convey clearly my intent by applying the major's methods, and people reacted well – well enough to give me a job as a graphic designer for a national company. I've since applied the English Discipline to programming, marketing, and social media. I continue to study branches of English and the liberal arts as an academic exercise. It has been the most relevant pursuit in my life to date."Tyler Schuster, Class of 2012